At CAKE 2016, we were disappointed that our Special Guest Trina Robbins had to cancel her appearance due to health concerns, but luckily, we were still able to have her come to Chicago this spring for some local events:

Wimmin’s Comix

Wednesday, March 15
5:00-6:00 PM
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
37 S Wabash Ave, Chicago

In 1970, Trina Robbins produced the very first all-woman comic book, It Ain’t me, Babe. In 1972, she was one of the founding mothers of Wimmin’s Comix, the longest-lasting women’s anthology comic book. (1972–1992). In the mid-1980s, tired of hearing publishers and editors say that girls don’t read comics and that women had never drawn comics, she co-wrote (with Catherine Yronwode) Women and the Comics, the first of what would become a series of histories of women cartoonists. She has been responsible for rediscovering previously forgotten early women cartoonists like Nell Brinkley, Tarpe Mills, and Lily Renee. Her new book, Babes in Arms, due out in Summer 2017, collects the work of four Golden Age women who fought the Axis with pen and ink, drawing comics that starred beautiful, courageous women who didn’t need to be rescued by some guy.

This lecture is open to the public, but non-SAIC attendees must have a state issued ID to check in with security upon entering the building.

Join the event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/748499208652940/

Women, Culture, and Comics

Thursday, March 16
6:00-8:00 PM
UIC Jane Addams Hull-House Museum
800 South Halsted Street, Chicago

As part of Chicago’s centennial celebration of Gwendolyn Brooks, Trina Robbins’ talk will focus on women and diversity in comics as vehicles for cultural understanding and social change. Her talk will draw from her various works, including the Junior Library Guild Selection graphic novel Chicagoland Detective Agency: The Drained Brains Caper and her forthcoming book Babes in Arms. A book-signing will follow.

Please RSVP at http://go.uic.edu/trinarobbins

About Trina Robbins

In 1970, Trina Robbins produced the very first all-woman comic book, It Ain’t me, Babe. In 1972 she was one of the founding mothers of Wimmin’s Comix, the longest-lasting women’s anthology comic book (1972 – 1992). In the mid-1980s, tired of hearing publishers and editors say that girls don’t read comics and that women had never drawn comics, she co-wrote (with Catherine Yronwode) Women in the Comics, the first of what would become a series of histories of women cartoonists.  She has been responsible for rediscovering previously forgotten early women cartoonists like Nell Brinkley, Tarpe Mills, and Lily Renee.  Her new book, Babes in Arms, due out in Summer, 2017, collects the work of four Golden Age women who fought the Axis with pen and ink, drawing comics that starred beautiful, courageous women who didn’t need to be rescued by some guy.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *